Grammar

  1. How To Pluralize Your Last Name

    If writing out your holiday cards or ordering a sign for the front of your house makes you break out in hives, you may know a few grammar sticklers who like to poke fun. You know the type: the people who own stock in red ink manufacturing and are quick to point out when you’ve misused that apostrophe and inappropriately pluralized your last name. But …

  2. Is Veterans Day A Big Grammar Mistake?

    What do apostrophes have to do with this federal holiday? Well, there’s a confusing apostrophe in Veterans’ Day—or is there? Veterans Day is often incorrectly written as “Veteran’s Day” or “Veterans’ Day.” But, in fact, it’s apostrophe free. “Veteran’s Day” would definitely be incorrect because it would mean a day for only one veteran. While “Veterans’ Day” does encompass multiple veterans, that spelling is incorrect …

  3. Does Traditional Grammar Matter When It Comes To Singular “They” And “Themself”?

    Has someone ever asked you to refer to them as they instead of he?or she? Or, are you hedging because you can’t possibly refer to one single person as they? Well, what if we told you that they has been used to refer to just one person since at least the 1300s? And what if we also told you themself is perfectly acceptable—and in many …

  4. What Is The Difference Between “Judgement” And “Judgment”?

    Have you ever seen the word judgment spelled two different ways? Sometimes, it appears as we spelled it here (no e), and other times it appears with an e: judgement. Which one is correct? Is?judgment?spelled with an?e? Well, the short answer is that?judgment is the prevailing (“dominant”) spelling. Judgment is a noun that has several meanings, including “the act or instance of judging,” and “the …

  5. “Have” vs. “Has”: When To Use Each One

    Have and has are different forms of the verb to have. Even though they come from the same word, there are slight differences in the way they’re used. While the verb to have has many different meanings, its primary meaning is “to possess, own, hold for use, or contain.” Have?and?has indicate possession in the present tense (describing events that are currently happening). Have is used …

  6. “Use To” vs. “Used To”: What’s The Difference?

    Remember as kids when we used to look forward to summer break every year? Unfortunately as we get older, we don’t have this mandated chunk of time off from work every year. But did we use to count down the days until school was out? Or did we used to look forward to the last day of school each year? Despite the minor difference—literally just …

  7. What Are The ( ) { } [ ] And ? ??

    Though these symbols—( ), [ ], { }, and ? ?—regularly appear in our books and screens, they all have odd, unexpected origins. What is the ( )? The most familiar of these symbols is probably the ( ), called parentheses. Fun fact: one of them is called a parenthesis, and as a pair, the plural are parentheses. Parenthesis literally means “to put beside,” from …

  8. Do We Need The Oxford Comma? Here Are 9 Hilarious Real-World Examples

  9. Punctuation Marks You Should Consider Using

    We’re all familiar with commas, periods, hyphens, and the like. Although semicolons can be confusing, we pretty much know what we’re doing when we punctuate a sentence. But don’t you get a little bored using the same old marks? Do you ever find yourself searching for the perfect way to convey a certain mood? As you’ll see, extra punctuation marks have been suggested at various …

  10. When Do You Use “Who” vs. “Whom”?

    Over the last 200 years, the pronoun whom has been on a steady decline. Despite its waning use in speech and ongoing speculation about its imminent extinction, whom still holds a spot in the English language, particularly in formal writing. Understanding when and how to use this pronoun can set your writing apart. If?whom?is on the decline, then who?must be growing in popularity. The two—as …

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