Origins

  1. image of the moon

    What Is The Origin Of The Name “Monday”?

    Nobody wants to come down with a case of the Mondays. But the second day of the week—and the first day of the traditional work week—doesn’t exactly have the best reputation.? Monday isn’t named after an ancient, one-handed Norse god like Tuesday is, and it doesn’t take its name from a powerful god who fashioned the human race like Wednesday does. Monday does, however, reference …

  2. Why Do We Say “Hello” And “Hi”?

    We use hello several times a day to greet people or attract attention. But as prevalent as the word is, it is relatively new. Where does?hello come from? While use of the term hello dates back earlier, it isn’t recorded with this exact spelling until the 1800s. Hello?is considered a variant on a number of other similar words—like hallo, holla, and hollo—that?were used?to hail and …

  3. Where Does The Name “October” Come From?

    October is here, and in the Northern Hemisphere, that often means the days are flush with falling leaves, chilling weather, and growing anticipation for the holiday season. The tenth month by our Gregorian calendar, October shares a root with octopus and octagon—the Latin octo and Greek okto, meaning “eight.” So, how did October become the 10th month? The original Roman calendar had only ten months, …

  4. Fall Once Had A Different Name

    We may now call it fall, but once upon a time, the season that comes after summer but before winter was referred to simply as harvest. An old name for fall According to the written record, harvest?is the earliest name for the third season of the year. It’s found in Old English as h?rfest, a word of Germanic stock, perhaps with an underlying, ancient sense …

  5. Where Did The Phrase “Thirty Days Hath September …” Come From?

    Just about every elementary schooler learns the months of the year with an easy rhyme: “Thirty days has [or hath] September, April, June, and November. All the rest have 31, except February …” How exactly does it end??That depends on how you learned the poem, but one common version goes: “All the rest have 31 /?But February’s 28 / The leap year, which comes once …

  6. The Holy Reason We Say “Goodbye” And What To Say Instead

    “So long, farewell …” This catchy tune from The Sound of Music is just one of many artistic reflections throughout the years on the ways we say goodbye. And it’s no wonder this parting word and its synonyms have been the subject of much rumination over the years as saying goodbye has become an integral part of our interactions with people, places, and things.? We …

  7. Why Does September Come From The Word “Seven”?

    For many, the month of September signals the end of summer, the beginning of autumn, and the start of a new school year. With respect to the calendar, September marks the beginning of the series of months named after their numerical position in the year. Strangely enough, however, September is not named after the number nine. What does September mean? September comes from the Latin …

  8. “Ketchup” And Other Words That Come From Mandarin Or Cantonese

    Think you only speak English? Think again. While you may not be fluent or able to write in another language, the fact is that English consists largely of words we’ve borrowed from other languages. In fact, about 80 percent of the English language is made up of these loanwords.?? It’s amazing really to think of how many languages you speak on a daily basis without …

  9. What Is “GOP” Short For?

    The origins of the Democratic and Republican parties tell an interesting story. They both developed from the same political group, the Democratic–Republicans Party led by Thomas Jefferson in the 1790s and early 1800s. Who knew that these two opposing parties were once on the same side of the political spectrum? One unique part of the Republican Party’s history, however, is its nickname: the GOP. Where …

  10. English Words That Came From Hindi And Urdu

    How many words from Hindi and Urdu do you know? Well, if you’re one of the approximately 70 million speakers of Urdu and 425 million of Hindi, then, well, you know a lot—and that’s only counting native speakers. Millions more speak Urdu and Hindi as a second language all around the globe, making them, combined, one of the most spoken languages.? But even if you …

色色影院-色色影院app下载